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Table of Contents - Volume 44, Issue 2 - April 2014

by Flo Appel last modified 2014-07-31 00:59

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Table of contents


Visuo-haptic learning of the inner ear: using the optical glyphs and augmented reality of the InvisibleEar©™

Andréa Zariwny, Patricia Stewart, Marc Dryer

Pages: 5-7

doi>10.1145/2656870.2656871


The anatomy of the inner ear is small and intricate. It is a complex area to describe with traditional teaching tools such as prosections and illustrations. The InvisibleEar mobile application (app) designed for teaching, uses a handheld mobile tablet ...

The anatomy of the inner ear is small and intricate. It is a complex area to describe with traditional teaching tools such as prosections and illustrations. The InvisibleEar mobile application (app) designed for teaching, uses a handheld mobile tablet device equipped with an integrated camera, and applies digital 3D models of the anatomical structure visually superimposed over illustrations or physical models thus highlighting hidden information or negative space.
 

Cloudsweeper and data-centric security

Peter Snyder, Chris Kanich

Pages: 8-10

doi>10.1145/2656870.2656872



Most security online is binary, where being authorized to access a system allows complete access to the requested resource. This binary system amplifies the harm of giving access to an unauthorized individual and motivates system designers to strengthen ...

Most security online is binary, where being authorized to access a system allows complete access to the requested resource. This binary system amplifies the harm of giving access to an unauthorized individual and motivates system designers to strengthen access control mechanisms to the point where they become so strong as to be nearly insurmountable for illegitimate and legitimate users alike.
As a result, Internet users are required to jump through several hoops to access their data: ever longer passwords, multiple authentication factors, or time consuming CAPTCHAs. Users must always provide strong proof of their identity, regardless of whether they want to check their email for something as innocuous as a movie time or as serious as a medical test result. Not surprisingly, users often disable or refuse to use these tedious security options [2, 5, 7].
Users may be better served by a data-centric approach to security, where systems are sensitive to the differing security needs of data, even within a single account or collection. A data-centric approach can apply strong security only when the data being protected warrants it, while allowing users a less encumbered experience the majority of the time. Machine learning techniques can automate the detection of sensitive information, freeing users from the tedious task of sorting their data into low and high security categories. With less friction involved in securing their data, users may be more likely to use strong security where available, resulting in a more secure Internet for everyone.
We present Cloudsweeper, a tool that applies a data-centric approach to security to the specific case of plain text password sharing in Gmail accounts. Cloudsweeper detects and applies an additional layer of encryption to plain text passwords in a user's email account, while allowing the user to access the rest of their email archive as normal. Public use of Cloudsweeper shows that such a data-centric approach to securing data can be an effective way of providing users more security while still being acceptably convenient.
 

Facilitative and rememberative: novel incentive structures for increased exercise in interactive media

Vaibhav Garg, Emily K. Adams, Nathaniel Husted, James Brown

Pages: 11-15

doi>10.1145/2656870.2656873


The traditional approaches to encourage gamers to exercise have been two-fold: incorporating in-game incentives and designing games that are based on exercise. We discuss the drawbacks of these approaches and introduce two new design constructs: facilitative ...

The traditional approaches to encourage gamers to exercise have been two-fold: incorporating in-game incentives and designing games that are based on exercise. We discuss the drawbacks of these approaches and introduce two new design constructs: facilitative and rememberative. A facilitative design introduces external interaction mechanisms that reward physical exertion with an increase of control over the utility and entertainment value of a game. The rememberative approach leverages "ambient" design artifacts embedded into the gaming experience reminding the gamer to exercise. We propose to explore the use of these design constructs in existing games and discuss two prototypes based on them.
 

Our responsibility to manage evaluative diversity

Christopher Santos-Lang

Pages: 16-19

doi>10.1145/2656870.2656874


The ecosystem approach to computer system development is similar to management of biodiversity. Instead of modeling machines after a successful individual, it models machines after successful teams. It includes measuring the evaluative diversity of human ...

The ecosystem approach to computer system development is similar to management of biodiversity. Instead of modeling machines after a successful individual, it models machines after successful teams. It includes measuring the evaluative diversity of human teams (i.e. the disparity in ways members conduct the evaluative aspect of decision-making), adding similarly diverse machines to those teams, and monitoring the impact on evaluative balance. This article reviews new research relevant to this approach, especially the validation of a survey instrument for measuring computational evaluative differences in humans (the GRINSQ). The research confirms the existence of all four known machine types among humans.
 

Ethics in context: a scandal in academia

Michael James Heron, Pauline Belford

Pages: 20-51

doi>10.1145/2656870.2656875


The delivery of ethical instruction within formal educational contexts is a task that is fraught with difficulties. Real world situations and examples of misconduct abound, but sourcing sufficient material within the constraints associated with developing ...

The delivery of ethical instruction within formal educational contexts is a task that is fraught with difficulties. Real world situations and examples of misconduct abound, but sourcing sufficient material within the constraints associated with developing course materials can be time-consuming. The availability of resources to illustrate relevant aspects may not be available, or may not fully emphasize the issues that educators wish to incorporate into their discussion of the material. At best, such an approach can only highlight in isolation - larger, overarching connections are rarely available. The provision of ethical instruction is now a core aspect of many undergraduate and postgraduate courses across a variety of disciplines, and accreditation bodies often include meeting the need for instruction in ethical and professional issues as a pre-requisite. In this paper we present a wide-ranging ethical case study called 'A Scandal in Academia'. It is a spiritual successor to the Case of the Killer Robot first published in the very early 1990s. The Scandal in Academia study has been trialed with students at all levels of the undergraduate curriculum and has been very effective in offering a coherent jumping-off point for a discussion of the implications of ethical and unethical activity. It is hoped that the provision of this study will be a useful tool for educators and others looking to investigate and present issues of professional responsibility within formal and informal contexts.
 

Using computer technology to address the problem of cyberbullying

R. Cohen, D. Y. Lam, N. Agarwal, M. Cormier, J. Jagdev, T. Jin, M. Kukreti, J. Liu, K. Rahim, R. Rawat, W. Sun, D. Wang, M. Wexler

Pages: 52-61

doi>10.1145/2656870.2656876


The issue of cyberbullying is a social concern that has arisen due to the prevalent use of computer technology today. In this paper, we present a multi-faceted solution to mitigate the effects of cyberbullying, one that uses computer technology in order ...

The issue of cyberbullying is a social concern that has arisen due to the prevalent use of computer technology today. In this paper, we present a multi-faceted solution to mitigate the effects of cyberbullying, one that uses computer technology in order to combat the problem. We propose to provide assistance for various groups affected by cyberbullying (the bullied and the bully, both). Our solution was developed through a series of group projects and includes i) technology to detect the occurrence of cyberbullying ii) technology to enable reporting of cyberbullying iii) proposals to integrate third-party assistance when cyberbullying is detected iv) facilities for those with authority to manage online social networks or to take actions against detected bullies. In all, we demonstrate how this important social problem which arises due to computer technology can also leverage computer technology in order to take steps to better cope with the undesirable effects that have arisen.



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